Skype – You Done Me Wrong

Well, hello. I’m back. And not just on my blog. I’m now back on Skype as well – no thanks to Microsoft.

A few months ago, I tried to open my Microsoft Skype and found myself locked out. I’ve had the account for maybe 9 or 10 years, all the way back to when Skype was a scrappy little online video conferencing tool called just plain Skype. At the time, we didn’t have too many options when it came to a reasonably good connection, and as a remote employee, it was an essential lifeline to my coworkers.

I know this because, when I went to rediscover my password, I encountered three obstacles:

  1. One of my emails was that very old work address. Can’t respond to that.
  2. Many of the ID questions wanted old answers. I couldn’t remember where I was living at the time or what car I owned when I subscribed, much less who I was connected to in my Skype account.
  3. When I tried to use the other, legit address on the account, none of the emails that Skype supposedly sent back to me actually arrived.

One email told me my account was now blocked due to suspicious activity and that I should try harder to log in. Then, their final response included this sage advice: “Because there have been multiple unsuccessful recovery attempts for this account, we recommend at this point that you create a new account.”

So – they are telling me, a Skype user for 9 years, that I have to start all over again. Who does that? My bank doesn’t. Twitter doesn’t. Even our pool club doesn’t.

I went online, searched for responses to people with the same problem, and found over 5 million search responses to “cannot get into Skype account.” Many of the sites suggested I had no real options, that my fate was sealed. I was the walking dead. Unable to admit defeat, I made four more attempts to get through the maze of automated requests and finally found a contact address and wrote in.

After a few back-and-forths with actual humans (I believe) named Lylle O. and Chariza V. from Skype Customer Service, we were no closer to an answer. Rather than actually go into my account and help unlock it, they continued to suggest that I needed to create a new account. I begged them to call me, offered to supply as much information as I could regarding the account. To prove myself as a real account owner. They stonewalled me. So I gave up.

Fast forward to last weekend: My brother asked me to Skype, so I tried one last effort to recover my account, this time using the mobile Skype app. And what do you know? The email with the verification code came through this time. I had to double verify my account and change the email twice, but I got back in. I also made sure to update the recovery settings.

Looking back to my experience of four months, I can’t help but feel sad for Skype under Microsoft. When a tool with millions and millions of users won’t bother to offer more than automated support tools or give employees the authority to actually help customers, it’s a clear sign that there’s room in the market for a responsive and user-friendly live chat tool. Three lessons here:

  1. Write down all my friends’ Skype addresses and add them to my phone contacts.
  2. Go back to all my old accounts and make sure I have the right email addresses and multiple contact methods enabled.
  3. Try something new: I’ve been hearing good things about WhatsApp, and it’s downloading to my phone right now. Maybe all my Skype friends will join me there.

 

Five Tips to Help You Win that Marketing Award

During this weekend’s snow storm and with the help of a few carafes of coffee, I completed my fourth annual BMA B2 Awards volunteer judging stint. This got me to thinking that it would be helpful to share the collected insights with my fellow B2B marketers.

gavelAs a global awards program, the B2s recognize excellence and innovation in business-to-business (B2B) marketing efforts such as global brand strategy, customer marketing strategy, integrated marketing communications, new media strategy (like social), and successful new product and service launches. The whole effort takes me about 6-10 hours, depending on which of the 80+ categories I’m assigned and the number of total entries within those sections. This year, I judged in social and blogging categories, which were new to me.

Why do I love spending my off-work time judging these awards? Perhaps it’s genetic: I’m descended from a deep bench of judges and lawyers (the gavel above was my grandfather’s). More likely is the fact that I totally geek out on the insider exposure I get to the exceptional marketing efforts of a diverse group of businesses and organizations. I learn something positive from each entry, and you know who gets to review 20+ FREE case studies? I do.

My Five Recommendations For Presenting Your Nomination

Looking back over the past four years of B2s, I can recognize patterns in the entries – both helpful and harmful – that are worth noting. Since it’s fresh on my mind, I thought I’d take a minute to reflect on these trends and lay out five general tips for those who are considering nominating a marketing campaign, strategy or asset to any local (e.g., Colorado BMA’s Gold Key Awards) or global awards program.

#1 – Tell a Story to Remember

We marketers excel at telling stories, and judges prefer these over the dry recitation of facts. So why don’t more entries take this approach? While your judges are probably know-it-all marketers (like me), they are also human beings. They can be swayed by your charisma and by the riveting plot line of your B2B marketing drama. Er, I mean marketing project. We never have drama in our line of work.

Start writing your nomination early and take the time to be just as creative as you were on the marketing campaign or asset or person you’re nominating. You must stand apart from your competition: make the story memorable, project enthusiasm and character and don’t shy away from descriptive language. Does your entry answer some or all of these:

  • Why did this matter to the company?
  • What were your company / department struggles?
  • How many people were involved?
  • What obstacles did you encounter? (no campaign is seamless)
  • To what did you attribute your victory?
  • What do the results mean beyond just the metrics themselves?
  • Did this have wider, longer, or unexpected impact on the organization?

I also suggest gathering an outsider’s point of view. Sit down with your spouse or a non-marketing friend or three over coffee or a craft beer and tell them your story. Avoiding business jargon, describe what you did, why you did it and how you succeeded.

Note the questions your audience asks and what grabs their attention. Then practice saying what you want to write, so it’s more accessible. Give yourself time to reflect on your story as you read, exercise, or brush the dog. Make sure to incorporate all of these ideas into your draft entry. Then, when you’re ready, approach a tougher, marketing-savvy audience to make sure your story covers the salient, professional facts.

#2 – Frame It Out First to Keep on Point

Please, please, please: do not write your nomination while in the actual online (or paper) form on the day it’s due. You’ve just wasted your entry fee, and it leaves the false impression that you don’t really care. Of course, you care! Even if yours is an amazing entry, when it feels rushed or presents a weak narrative, it can’t defend itself against a well crafted and perhaps less deserving competitor. Rest assured that the lion’s share of all entries will be well written and yours must be, too.

So as soon as you decide to apply, take time to read the qualifications and questions. They usually follow a logical flow from objectives to results. Copy and paste them into a document and over the next week or two build out the outline / framework in Word, PowerPoint, stickies or whatever tool you find works best. Start writing as many notes into each section as you can. If you’re feeling disconnected from the details, host a brown bag with a few of your team members or the customer (if you’re an agency) to recapture the whole story.

Time dedicated to framing matters because your final nomination has to be brief, focused and complete. Some tips:

  • Start big and then edit fiercely.
  • Pay attention to the balance between the right kind of details and too much detail. If you’re not sure, enlist your biggest critic to review your draft.
  • Your overall summary should never be more than two paragraphs and should highlight the best aspects of the whole nomination.
  • Just like you do with your best marketing content, focus on readability (bullets are good, as are short paragraphs). Some judges may skim if they have 10-20 entries in the category.
  • And don’t repeat facts. I’ve seen entries that use the exact same words in multiple sections, despite that one calls for objectives and the other calls for execution details. It’s sloppy, boring and detracts from your story.
  • Don’t repeat facts. Really. Unless you do it for emphasis like I just did.
  • And make sure you have strong results / metrics that you tie back to your original objectives. For some awards, like branding, that can be a challenge, but you should still take extra time to focus on this section. Rest assured that hte judges will.

#3 – Use Visuals to Transport the Judge

Most of us are visual learners, and abstract campaigns do not inspire. They aren’t dull when you actually do them, so why reduce them for the awards? When the nomination form asks for uploads of examples, videos, URLs, or overviews, make the most of it. Show the judge the banner ads of which you are justifiably proud. Let them see the video that garnered a 35% email open and clickthrough rate. Give them examples of your humorous nurturing emails. Share openly, but only if you want to win.

Some of the best work I’ve seen so far was done by the agencies that are seasoned pros of the award circuit. Several have a standard format PPT-based PDF that repeats the entire story in stylish images and text. Granted, when the same agency submits four awards in your category, and all of them start to look the same, that tactic can work against itself. But still, if you move the judge with your words and then compliment those with a set of informative visuals, it’s the best possible differentiator. I am still saddened by otherwise interesting entries that ignore this critical asset.

#4 – Double-check Before You Hit Submit

This may seem like a minor point, but it’s always the smallest things that trip you up, especially if you’re running up against the deadline. For example, if you’re cutting and pasting from a document into an online form, make sure you’re pasting as plain text. Rich text like apostrophes will more often come across as unreadable symbols, and you may never even see this because it won’t have been translated to the final format until after you’ve submitted.

Readability and polish can count just as much as the content, and you don’t want to make the judge struggle to get your point. One entry that I saw just this year was dominated by all sorts of styles and fonts that made it into an unnecessary eye test. It also included about ten ghostly rectangles that I can only assume were images that could not be stored but were still defined in the underlying HTML coding.

You never know what you’ll get, so stay conservative. Remember that most of these online tools, while handy, lack adequate spell checking. If you type as well as I do, that’s going to be a problem. It pays to check your grammar prior to inputting your responses. If you have the time, get a colleague to review the final version.

#5 – Make Sure to Have Fun with It

Probably an obvious recommendation, but you’d be surprised how serious some of the entries can feel. You – the nominator – have probably been tasked with this job above and beyond your usual responsibilities. No time, few resources and the mandate to make this entry outshine all the others. So, no pressure.

I say relax. It’s just an award. Sure, that shiny piece of glass can justify marketing’s continued fanfare within the company, but let’s face it, you’re going to get more mileage out of the successful asset, campaign or person that you’re writing about in the first place. This is more like the final bound thesis than the oral exam you just aced. You’ve already done the hard work of actual marketing, so approach the award nomination process with some pleasure. Do your best and see what happens. The world smiles back when you smile first.

And bonus tip #6: Once you have written and submitted the nomination, create a second visual, company-friendly version. Post it on your intranet, share it with a list of inside influencers and managers or feature it in the internal newsletter. Let the rest of your business know the good work you’ve been doing!

 

I’ll Never Be a Pre-crastinator

In my world, a successful Sunday is defined not by a Broncos win but by the opportunity to read more than half of our New York Times without being interrupted. And if I read a particularly well-written Op-Ed piece in that rare window of quietude, the victory is that much sweeter.

So what a pleasure to see the article from Adam Grant, “Why I Taught Myself to Procrastinate,” in The Review section of this week’s Times. Grant, a professor of management and psychology at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, generally writes about the psychology of business, which I find fascinating. This time, the subject was near and dear: procrastination.

I’ll concede that there might be some truth to the accusation that I am, indeed, something of a kind of procrastinator. I do tend to delay tasks until the due date raps bare knuckled on my door. But what I love about the article is how it strengthens what I have been saying all along: that delaying a task (e.g., writing a blog post) generally gives me more time to consider it. That a pause for reflection generates a higher quality result in creative endeavors that require a certain amount of mental accomplishment, like writing a paper or finishing a business project.

Now “pre-crastination,” which Grant describes as the impetus to complete a task as soon as it’s defined (his natural state), will never be my Modus Operandi. Finishing a project weeks ahead of time? Naw. But neither will you find me waiting to the very last minute.

In either of these extremes, Grant writes, the research shows that the creative impulse is lessened, either because there’s not enough time relegated to thinking about new ideas (as with pre-crastination) or not enough time remaining to avoid falling for the easy answers (the result of extreme procrastination). So it’s with great relief that I find myself habitually within the creative red zone. Not too early but not too late. Procrastination as a positive force.

I highly doubt this article will pass as justification for the unfinished basement project, but it may just buy me enough time to finish the rest of the Sunday paper.

Missing a Letter?

As a small child, few songs had as much power over my imagination as the classic Sesame Street jingle “Silent E,” written and composed by Tom Lehrer. It was hilarious to watch, easy to memorize, and a solid lesson on just how precious each letter is to the whole meaning of the word. For your enjoyment:

Fast forward to the present. Fed from a sturdy diet of William Safire’s “On Language” column and NPR’s puzzle master Will Shortz, I have become an avowed Word Geek.

Back to Silent E. As I said, removing a single letter can have dramatic impact on the word’s meaning, and I’ve been collecting examples recently where a “good” word takes on more sinister tones when a letter goes missing. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Brother and bother
  • Friend and fiend
  • Affluent and effluent
  • Focal and fecal
  • Moral and morel

See how it goes? If you can think of other examples, send them my way.

Side note:  I see this as different from phone autocorrect issues, where more than a single letter is replaced. There are some hilarious examples of that here:  http://www.damnyouautocorrect.com.

In Memorium: Abby the Cat

Today we had to put Abby the cat to rest. Almost 20, she “did it her way,” as Frank Sinatra sang. Aloof in her early and middle years, Abby mellowed dramatically in later life, suffering through our attention and petting, I suspect, as a way to siphon off our body heat. She was always cold.

Six years ago, I wrote a blog post about Abby when I was running the marketing for an eLearning company that focused on process improvement and product design. I looked for it today, and though they have since removed it from their website (!), I was able to locate it via the Wayback Machine. Nothing dies on the Internet.

I present it as a way to honor the memory of the extended life of sweet, dear Abby. Certainly not my best work, but a classic Abby story.

iPod Destructive Testing Using Cat

Yes, I still have the cat, for now.

March 09, 2009 – This morning, my cat threw up a hairball on my iPod. I kid you not.

As the, well, regurgitation, soaked in through the front navigation wheel, I saw enough to know that there was liquid mixed in with the delicate innards. This was much like the “coffee on a laptop” scenario, so I knew not to turn the iPod on. But will it still work, and what does this have to do with e-Learning and design? There are two important connections.

Abby the CatFirst, my online search for “iPod and water” (“iPod and bile” was never a realistic candidate) reinforced an important tenet of Blended Learning. Many people mistakenly believe that Blended Learning is simply a combination of e-Learning and instructor led training.

In actuality, effective Blended Learning is much more. It is defined as learning from many components, including e-Learning, coaching, live classes, online sources, blogs, forums, simulations, team exercises, and even textbooks. Self directed learning from online technologies (e.g., YouTube, Facebook, Second Life) is also included in the recognized Blended Learning sources, and is one of the fastest growing methods used by professionals to advance their knowledge. After the adrenaline rush, it occurred to me that my own use of Google represented a now-ingrained and non-traditional learning method.

Second, I realized that if my iPhone had been the victim, I would probably not have had a crisis at all. As we all know, Apple constantly modifies and improves its designs, and my phone has a fairly seamless front surface that would not have allowed the, um, cat liquids, to penetrate. The lack of a keyboard is a breakthrough innovation that still triggers curiosity from non-owners, and the nearly solid surface is just one aspect of the overall design. If only I had left my iPhone on the buffet last night.

So, will my iPod still work? Online forum advice leads me to believe that the odds are good, as long as I keep it face down and in a warm dry place, like a car dashboard. I now have it positioned far away enough from a space heater to warm – not toast – it to dryness. It is resting comfortably, with a positive prognosis. Perhaps I will try to turn it on Christmas morning and receive my own little holiday miracle.